1. jeannepompadour:

    Illuminations from the “Hours of Mary of Burgundy” made in Flanders, c. 1477

    Man, that first image just made me go “Whoa…”

    (via sexycodicology)

     
  2. oursoulsaredamned:

     books of hours by Marmion.

    (via demoniality)

     
  3. abystle:

    Mount Yoshino Midnight Moon, From the One Hundred Aspects of the Moon series, Tsukioka Yoshitoshi,1886.

    "Against the advice of his general Masashige, Emperor Go-Daigo (1288-1339) was encouraged by courtier Sasaki Kiyotaka, for his own political gain, to fight the rebelling forces of Ahikaga Takauji at the battle of Minatogawa in 1336. As a result of losing the battle, Masashige committed suicide and the Emperor fled to Mount Yoshino, where Kiyotaka was also forced to commit suicide. Kiyotaka’s ghost haunted and harried the exiled courtiers, none of whom dared to face it. Finally it was confronted by Masashige’s daughter-in-law, the heroic Iga no Tsubone, who drove it away." [x]

     

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  5. oursoulsaredamned:

    Carlos Schwabe Benediction (1900) for “Les Fleurs du mal” Charles Baudelaire

    (via demoniality)

     

  6. orthopraxis:

    Zikr from Aleppo, Syria.

    (via isgandar)

     
  7. okayophelia:

    MATRIARCHAL VATICAN

    On the chair of St. Magdalena she, the Vicar of Christ, sits with all the Princesses of the Church arrayed about her. God speaks through her, thunders through her devout but never demure body, armies of pacification ride beneath her banners, god-fearing monarchs petition her for their crowns, and thousands fall to their knees when she walks out into the sun and raises her hands to the heavens. She is the Church, and outside of her, there is no salvation.

    (via thefirstdark)

     
  8. freakyfauna:

    The Youth from Atikythera, 340 B.C.

    From a publication by the National Archeological Museum of Athens.

    Can’t not reblog.  The eyes in this statue get me every time.

    (via isgandar)

     
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  10. jeannepompadour:

    "The Queen of Sheba" from the illustrated military manual "Bellifortis by Konrad Kyeser,  c. 1405

    (via sexycodicology)